Copyright 2016


Adam Norton : Seeing Red


by Clare Lewis, Adam Norton - 9 Projects, artists catalogue 2012



Adam Norton grew up in the shadow of the Cold War—that strange, lengthy, paranoid period, pregnant with the very real threat that one half of the world could essentially destroy the other. The turbulent second half of the 20th Century was dominated by the threat of nuclear attack. It produced the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, the first broadcasting of the grisly reality of war in Vietnam, and the conquest of the Moon. It was a time when both the constructive and destructive possibilities of civilisation were drawn sharply into focus. While the hunt for ultimate power put the end of the world in a button, this same rapid technological expansion made exploration beyond our own planet feasible, and put the heavens within our reach. New age idealism envisioned a life beyond the confines of the earth’s atmosphere—the frontier was high, establishing life in space was not just a technological landmark but a crucial outpost for the survival of mankind, stranded as we are on the only planet as yet discovered to be accommodating to human life. Outer space became a repository for both dreams and paranoia and these projected discoveries were, as with any colonising entity, most telling of the fantasies and fears of the coloniser. During the emergence of the sci-fi genre for instance, the concept of alien invasion was an allegory for the fear of foreign occupation.1 The Space Race that preoccupied the hearts and minds of the era became not simply an intrepid mission to explore other planets and colonise space, but an achievement that would symbolise the military and ideological superiority of either the USSR or the USA. (Excerpt)


Adam Norton: Seeing Red PDF